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drunk driving Archives

Breathalyzer for marijuana faces many hurdles

In 2012, Washington passed Initiative 502, which legalized the recreational use of marijuana by persons over the age of 21. One of the difficulties with recreational use of marijuana, however, is that the drug can impair a person's ability to safely operate an automobile. Even proponents of the legal use of cannabis acknowledge that the drug can cause almost the equivalent of drunk driving, and they concede the need for a portable roadside device that will reliably test for the concentration of marijuana in a person's body. So far, efforts to invent such a device have met many obstacles.

Allegedly drunk driver faces DUI, child endangerment charges

Drunk driving is often viewed by Vancouver residents as a "victimless" offense - unless and until a drunk driver causes injury to another person. A recent drunk driving accident in Northeast Vancouver involving young children shows how quickly a DUI can snowball into far more serious charges.

Who is required to use ignition interlock devices in Washington?

An ignition interlock device can be required by the Washington State Department of Licensing for drivers who have been convicted of a drunk driving offense but who need to be able to drive their vehicle for work or other approved purposes. The law operates in two basic ways: the Department can require the use of an ignition interlock device for anyone convicted of a drunk driving offense, or a person convicted of a drunk driving offense can ask permission to use the device in order to continue driving.

DUI suspect tries to escape in car missing a front tire

When a driver is pulled over by the police, one of the first impulses might be to flee, especially if the driver is aware that he or she is drunk. Most drivers resist the impulse to escape, but, on occasion, a drunk driver will make the situation worse by trying to speed away from the police.

Understanding Washington's implied consent law

One of Washington's most powerful weapons for enforcing its drunk driving laws is the so-called "implied consent law." While many Washington drivers may have heard of this law, very few understand how it may affect them. The implied consent statute provides a method by which police officers can compel drivers to submit to a test of their sobriety before deciding whether to charge them with one or more drunk driving offenses.

Washington's distracted driver law takes effect

Washington's attempts to eliminate distracted driving moved to a new level on July 23, 2017, when the state's zero tolerance law went into effect. The law aims to prevent drivers from doing anything but driving while they are operating a motor vehicle. According to police, the new law is aimed at sharply reducing the number of car accidents on Washington's highways.

Drunk driver injures two in three-car accident

Drunk driving in Washington is a serious crime even if no aggravating factors, such as a prior conviction or an accident that causes injury or death, are present. When a drunk driver causes an accident that results in injury or death, the penalties can escalate. The driver in a recent three-car accident in Vancouver now faces one or more drunk driving charges.

How are field sobriety tests administered?

It is Saturday night, and a Washingtonian decide to go out with friends for dinner and some live music. Next thing they know, the clock is striking midnight and they had a couple drinks too many. Even worse, better judgement left the bar a few hours ago and they decide to drive home. No problem, right? Halfway home, they see lights ahead and all the cars are slowing down. It is a DUI checkpoint, and they know they are over the legal limit.

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Marsh, Higgins, Beaty & Hatch, P.C.
1112 Daniels Street, Suite 200
Vancouver, WA 98660

Toll Free: 866-678-1372
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